Energy Management Guidelines for South African Wineries. Brent, A.; Sanetra, N. & Silinga C. Winetech (2014).

This energy management guideline was commissioned by Winetech, in collaboration with the Centre for Renewable and Sustainable Energy Studies (CRSES) at Stellenbosch University, with the aim to support the South African wine industry to improve energy performances and energy efficiencies, while supporting the goals of the Confronting Climate Change project.

The guideline is based on the principles of the ISO 50001 standard for Energy Management Systems and draws on energy guidelines from other wine industries; in Australia, the United States, the European Union, and England. The practical examples that are contained within the guideline are derived from energy audits that were conducted at various wineries in the Western Cape Province.

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Guidelines for the management of waste-water and solid waste at existing wineries. Winetech (2005).

Introduction

Increases in wine production in South Africa over the past decade have exacerbated the pressure which the industry exerts on natural resources such as water, soil and vegetation. This increase has occurred at a time when national legislation and foreign markets are becoming increasingly stringent in their demands that all factors which have the potential to affect the environment should be controlled...

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Impact of alternative pruning methods (hand, mechanical, minimal) on the yield, grape- and wine quality and the physiology of the grapevine. ARC (2014).

The aim of this study was to further investigate the yield, grape- and wine quality trends that were obtained in Robertson region with hand, mechanical and minimal pruning of Chardonnay, Chenin blanc, Colombar, Sauvignon blanc, Ruby Cabernet and Shiraz. In addition, the study aimed to quantify and compare physiological aspects involved with the different pruning methods in order to find fundamental explanations and to test and set viticulture principles.

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Site selection for specific cultivar wine styles. Winetech (2013).

During discussions of the Winetech Terroir Program Industry Committee it was noted that most projects in the terroir programme were impeded by similar problems. One is the shortage of the readily available soil and climatic data coverage of wine grape growing regions and secondly that most projects stop short of Final report 3 This document is confidential and any unauthorised disclosure is prohibited. making a viable industry recommendation, due to the large number of variables that must be included and the enormous amount of data that is generated. The project aims to produce high resolution GIS based soil and climatic data maps for the South African wine regions together with a model to identify suitable sites to produce specific wine styles for different cultivars in order to make viable recommendations in this regard.

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Waste Management in the South African Wine Industry. Dillon,C. (2011).

Abstract

The 1996 Constitution of South Africa has heralded significant changes in how citizens access land in terms of management and sustainability. In a country where water is scarce, farmers are now accountable for how they access and handle their water as a result of a shift from private ownership to that of public ownership. Global climate change and carbon emissions have impacted on how production processes are carried out and their impact on the environment. Environmental organisations and governments of the world continue to put pressure on both consumer and producer to meet climate change targets. There is enormous scrutiny of imported products in the UK in terms of carbon miles, choice of packaging and down-streaming of resultant waste. Consumers are acutely aware of their responsibility in fighting the war on waste and demonstrate this through purchase of preferred green products. Waste generated through the production of wine should be regarded as part and parcel of the winemaking process. The decisions and subsequent processes taken in the vineyard and wine cellar directly determine the sustainability of a farm, the wine industry and agriculture in this country.

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Wine Industry Report. Confronting Climate Change 2014.

The 2014 Confronting Climate Change (CCC) industry benchmark process builds on the 2013-2014 dataset and provides a meaningful platform for the South African fruit and wine industries to better understand and reduce their use of fossil fuel based resources as reported through the carbon footprint output. This report serves to highlight the specific details from the Wine industry carbon footprint data and to highlight areas where mitigation action will have the greatest impact. The three years combined season data (2011-2014) was used for the assessment and was analyzed based on the main business activities: farm, winery processing and winery bottling. All results are shown in the internationally accepted form of kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalent per unit – in this case, per kilogram of fruit produced – or kgCO2e/kg fruit - or for winery as - kgCO2e/liter wine. In addition to the carbon emission results, consumption benchmark data was gathered and analyzed for certain key indictors to add context to the regional and individual variances.

Authors: Blignaut, A. & de Kock, L. 

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Integrated Production of Wine: Guidelines for Farms. ARC 2014.

Introduction

The consequences of increasing demands on natural resources and agricultural production systems by an ever-increasing world population have brought about an awareness of the necessity to protect non-renewable natural resources and the environment in order to ensure man's future health and well-being, as well as sustainable, economically viable agricultural production. A key concept that is used to convey an understanding of the environment is biodiversity. Biodiversity means that nature is composed of significant variation of genes, species and ecosystems, and implies that dynamic processes maintain this diversity. This diversity allows ecosystems and species to recover from natural disasters and adapt more readily to changes in the environment. When genetic vigour and species are lost and ecosystem processes are impeded, nature responds unpredictably, thus affecting our ability to plan production and protect natural resources...

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