Agriculture and the Green Economy in South Africa: A CSIR Analysis 2014.

Introduction

Africa has seen exponential economic growth in recent years with an average Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth of 3.1 - 6.6% between 2004 and 2013 (African Economic Outlook, 2014). This rapid growth is expected to continue in 2014, with average projected GDP growth at 5.3% (World Bank, 2013). Although most African countries experience economic growth, they continue to face challenges related to urbanisation, changing climatic conditions, globalisation and declining agricultural output. The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA, 2012) highlights that internal challenges facing African countries include persistent poverty, unemployment, and degradation of the natural resource base which underpins economic activity; due to factors such as deforestation, soil erosion, desertification, loss of biodiversity, and the effects of climate change...

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Better Production for a Living Planet. WWF 2013.

This publication is a product of WWF's Market Transformation Initiative (MTI), focusing on areas of greatest opportunity in the business sector and using market forces to drive the WWF conservation agenda...

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The Future of Food 2015-2030: Four scenarios examining possible futures of the food system in South Africa. South Africa Food Lab 2015.

Introduction

What is the future of food in South Africa? What might the food system look like in 2030, in terms of production, processing, distribution and consumption? Many people are asking similar questions and producing vision statements, policies and forecasts to enable anticipation and planning in a volatile system. They are all telling stories about the future – some optimistic, some dire. But these stories tend to be disconnected, narrated past each other to different audiences...

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The GreenChoice Living Farm Reference 2009/2010 version. Goldblatt, A. (ed.). WWF for Nature Conservation International. 

This document outlines basic sustainability guidelines that can be applied across different farms and includes brief descriptions of the methodologies and practice currently associated with sustainable agriculture in South Africa. 

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Agriculture: Facts & Trends. WWF.

Foreword (Dr Morné du Plessis CEO WWF-SA)

This report provides a snapshot of the overwhelming evidence that we need better environmental practices if we want to ensure ongoing productive agricultural systems and food security in South Africa. It also serves to underpin WWF’s drive to promote the protection of natural ecosystems, which produce the critical goods and services that underpin agricultural practices in the country. We have not attempted to specify every issue, but rather aimed to provide a broad view of the negative impacts of agricultural development that is focused on maximum productivity by exploiting natural resources while disregarding the complex hidden costs – financial and otherwise – of food production. It also highlights some of the best-practice solutions we need to follow if we want to meet our growing demand for food and fibre – one of the key challenges of the 21st century. The information has been compiled from diverse and reliable sources to construct a vivid picture of the state of our agricultural resources. It is intended to stimulate debate and catalyse collaboration throughout the agricultural value chain.

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An Introduction to South Africa's Water Source Areas. WWF 2013.

Introduction

The availability of freshwater is one of the major limiting factors to South Africa’s development. We are a water-scarce country with rainfall distributed unevenly in our landscape, inconveniently away from the centres of mining and industry, and tied to seasonal cycles that drive us repeatedly from feast to famine, between floods and droughts...

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Living Planet Report. WWF 2014.

The Living Planet Report is the world's leading, science-based analysis on the health of our planet and the impact of human activity. Knowing we only have one planet, WWF believes that humanity can make better choices that translate into clear benefits for ecology, society and the economy today and in the long term. 

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